National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

B Projects

Gravitational Wave Project Office

About Gravitational Wave Project Office

The first observations of gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes made by the LIGO detectors, have shown the potential of gravitational wave astronomy in revealing new aspects of the Universe that cannot be observed by other means. In order to open this new window over the Universe, we are promoting the KAGRA project in collaboration with ICRR, KEK and other universities. KAGRA is a large cryogenic gravitational wave telescope using a 3 kilometer laser interferometer placed in the Kamioka underground site. TAMA300, the 300-m laser interferometer situated on Mitaka campus, is a prototype of KAGRA and acts as a test facility to evaluate key elements and techniques before its installation on KAGRA. The project office is also promoting DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (DECIGO) in space in anticipation of its future development.

Photo of KAGRA and Illustration of the gravitational waves

KThe first large suspension system installed into a KAGRA vacuum chamber.
The first large suspension system installed into a KAGRA vacuum chamber.
Illustration of the gravitational waves emitted by a coalescing neutron star binary
Illustration of the gravitational waves emitted by a coalescing neutron star binary. KAGRA will detect the waves if such an event were to occur within 700 million light years of Earth.

Telescopes

KAGRA

KAGRA

KAGRA is a large-scale laser interferometer, with 3 kilometers long L-shaped arms, built in underground tunnels in Kamioka, Gifu Prefecture.

KAGRA

TAMA300

TAMA300

TAMA300 is an interferometric gravitational wave antenna with a baseline length of 300 meters erected at NAOJ Mitaka Campus.

TAMA300

Gravitational Wave Project Office Official Website